Terrible Boardgame Idea

Monopsony

All property cards are doled out at the beginning. They represent
local industries.

Every turn you gain 100 dollars in revenue.

For every property you have, every turn you lose x dollars in labor
costs to all other players.

x = percent of properties your opponents hold, e.g. if you control
10/40 properties, you lose 75 dollars per turn.

If you have all properties of a single color, you have monopsony over
one local industry. You can drop the labor costs now. Those properties
no longer count for anyone when tallying x.

At beginning of each turn, each player must put one property up for
auction. Everyone, including the person auctioning the property, may bid.

First person to control all the jobs wins.

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4 Responses to Terrible Boardgame Idea

  1. XMD says:

    Who do the property bids go to? The person putting them up for auction?
    In that event, what stops them from saying “I put all my money toward buying this property,” and then paying themselves all that money, keeping the property, and then bidding on someone else’s property too?
    -I’m guessing that the bidding phase is effectively simultaneous; bids are placed, and then everything’s resolved at the end of the phase, such that the winnings from your property don’t reach you until bidding is over.

    This is an interesting variant, and though it could use some tiny-detail level work, it sounds… well, not “fun,” but “playable.” Uh, “more fun than regular Monopoly?”

  2. Noah Motion says:

    This sounds every bit as good as Monopoly, maybe even better.

  3. Tab Atkins says:

    Hrm, I’m probably being thick, because there are several details I don’t understand.

    You say that each turn, for every property you control, you lose X dollars, where X is the percentage of non-owned property. In your example, you own 10 properties, and your opponents own 75% of the total, so you lose… .75 * 10? That only equals 7.5, though, not 75 like your example shows. Or am I over-interpreting your turn of phrase, and you just pay 75 dollars because it’s 75%, done?

    To whom do you pay this money – the bank or the other players? If the other players, how do you distribute it?

    Unless I’m missing something, having a monopsony seems to actually be bad – it increases the percentage of industries that your opponents hold. In your example, if you gained a monopsony over the dark purple industries (two tiles), the distribution would now be 30/38, or about 79%, so you’d have to pay *more* money out. What’s wrong with my understanding?

  4. Benedikt says:

    @XMD and @Tab Atkins

    “To whom do you pay this money”?

    If I got it right:
    “For every property you have, every turn you lose x dollars in labor
    costs to all other players.”

    I read this as: you pay x dollars which are split up among all the other players.

    @Tab Atkins:
    ” In your example, you own 10 properties, and your opponents own 75% of the total, so you lose… .75 * 10?”

    You got it wrong. Your opponents own 75%, that is 75 Percent. That means you pay 75 Dollar – no further multiplication needed.

    “Unless I’m missing something, having a monopsony seems to actually be bad – it increases the percentage of industries that your opponents hold.”

    In fact you did miss a little thing (I think):
    “You can drop the labor costs now.”
    So you don’t have to pay anything for labor (in this segment of industry) anymore. Think Foxconn-wages rounded down.

    I’m not sure whether I got it right. But I will try it out this way. I suppose you will use a Monopoly-board?

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